The Perfect Jewish Diet or, Why do we really eat good at Holy Shabbat? – part 1

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Hi.

My name is Eran. I’m Myriam’s husband, and as she said in the about page, she wants to add more content to this blog. So I was recruited to take upon me the philosophical-spiritual side of the texts here, so I better get spiritual. Or Rabbinical. Or something.

So let’s begin with a talk about Body and Soul, and then get to our Jewish Diet.

Orthodox Judaism does not solicit excessive  earthly pleasures.
A Jew should take from this world only that which is required for Avodat Hashem, for serving G-d.
Anything beyond that is regarded as luxury, and while not being actually sinful, is generally to be avoided.

[GOSH DON’T CLICK AWAY! IT’S NOT AS BAD AS IT SOUNDS!!!]

Now this is the case for most days of the year.
It is quite the contrary with holy Shabbats and Chags (holidays).
Then [SIGH OF RELIEF], even earthly pleasures become a matter of sanctity.
That is why we really feast & revel on Shabbats and Chags – without any remorse.

It is actually our spiritual health; but it is even more than that.
Potentially it could really guard our bodily health too – if only we observed some very simple rules.
In order to understand this better, we must delve deeper into what’s the spiritual difference between normal weekdays and Holy Shabbats.

I want to talk about this in a future post, so see you there!

Eran

myriamsolomon
myriamsolomon
Myriam Solomon shares kitchen tips and much more to make your Shabbat perfect

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